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Nurture groups and parental engagement

Nurture groups are a multi-dimensional group intervention with a whole-school focus, and running them successfully depends on a wide array of different factors. In thisarticle exploring nurture groups, Batul Al-Khatib…

Free article: How to improve parental engagement

Parental engagement remains an area for improvement for most schools. Matt Bromley explores how to do it well.

Landmark ruling on the Isle of Wight case: An opinion

Ben Whitney gives his take on the recent Supreme Court ruling.

Free article: Children, school and part-time work

Ben Whitney enters the debate on the role of children in the workplace and discusses what help and regulation should exist to support them.

Free article: Employability skills and Ofsted

Under the new inspection framework, schools will be inspected on pupils' economic well-being – and that includes attendance rates. 

Free article: A-Z of codes - Applying the codes in practice

To conclude this series of reference guides, Ben Whitney reflects on some of the issues it has raised, both in correspondence and through questions by participants at Forum attendance conferences.

Free article: The common inspection framework Personal development, behaviour and welfare

A new common inspection framework is now in effect, and pupil attendance can be reviewed in terms of personal development, behaviour and welfare.

A-Z of Codes 5: Codes M, N, O, P and R

Continuing his series of handy reference guides, Ben Whitney explores each of the recommended Codes in detail, including:

Free article: Infection control in schools

Infections that cause diarrhoea, vomiting, common colds and flu are responsible for the loss of thousands of school days each year. Martin Hodgson gives guidance on what you need to…

Free article: Prosecution or penalty notice: Which is the correct response?

Ben Whitney looks at the circumstances that might dictate how schools and local authorities respond to cases of persistent absence.

Free article: Managing difficult conversations

Some conversations -whether with pupils, their parents or colleagues - are always going to be uncomfortable. In this article, Louise Wingrove looks at managing difficult subjects with care and confidence.

Free article: Parental engagement: working with hard-to-reach families

In this article, Professor Ken Reid explores some of the many options for families to play a larger part in school life, with potential benefits for both the children and…

Free article: A-Z of codes 1: marks for 'present'

In this series of handy reference guides, Ben Whitney explores each of the recommended Codes in detail.

Free article: The use of penalty notices: the pros and cons

Professor Ken Reid examines the use of penalty notices (PNs) since the Children Act 2006, including some discussion on recent developments in Wales and the issue of regional variations in…

Free article: Incentivising attendance - what really works

David Birch outlines the importance of reward systems as a means of improving attendance in schools. Read on to find out about the merits of commercial schemes and the essential…

Free article: Practical tips for transforming lateness into punctuality

Steve Baker provides some practical advice on how to tackle persistent lateness and develop school-wide policies to encourage, develop and maintain punctuality.

Free article: Best practice case study: Waldegrave School

Our reporter Helen Clark finds out how one outstanding school has just achieved its best-ever attendance figures.

Free article: How to improve parental engagement

Published: Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Parental engagement remains an area for improvement for most schools. Matt Bromley explores how to do it well.

Summary

  • Research suggests that home–school communications have improved over the last 25 years, but that parental engagement remains an area for improvement in most schools.
  • Communication should start early and continue throughout a pupil’s journey through school; it should be two way, timely and useful.
  • The use of technology, such as email, texting and the school’s website, can assist in effective and efficient communication.
  • Hard-to-reach parents are often those the school needs to contact most, so ways to communicate with them must be found.

MetLife research from 2012 suggests that, although home–school communications have improved over the last 25 years, parental engagement remains an area for improvement in most schools.

According to research, effective parental engagement is important for many reasons:

  • It is associated with higher academic achievement.
  • It leads to increased rates of pupil attendance.
  • It can have a positive effect on pupils’ attitudes to learning and on their behaviour.

Research has shown that getting a school’s communications policy right can lead to:

  • an increased level of interest among pupils in their work
  • increased parental satisfaction with their child’s teachers
  • higher rates of teacher satisfaction.

So the big question is, ‘How can parental engagement be improved?’

How to improve parental engagement

Firstly, communication needs to start early and continue throughout a pupil’s journey through school. The parents of pupils moving from nursery to primary school, or from primary to secondary, will not want to receive information halfway through the summer holiday, by which time they will probably feel that it is too late. Schools need to engage with parents early and clearly set out their expectations and requirements.

Secondly, communication needs to be a two-way process: parents need a means of keeping in contact with the school, as well as the school staying in touch with parents. One way to do this is to create a FAQ page, as well as a Q&A facility and a parents’ forum on the school’s website. This will need to be monitored carefully by a designated member of staff, or comments could pass through a ‘gatekeeper’ in order to be vetted before they go ‘live’. If this is to be viewed as worthwhile, the school will also need to communicate its response to parental comments and suggestions. This could be done through a ‘You Said, We Did’ page, for example.

Thirdly, communications need to be appropriately timed, relevant and useful. One way to do this is to utilise the experience and expertise of pupils and their parents. For example, the parents of current Reception or Year 7 pupils will be able to share their thoughts on what information they needed when they went through the transition process with their child, as well as when they needed it most. Current Reception or Year 7 pupils will be able to offer their advice about how to prepare for primary or secondary school by, for example, providing a reading list for the summer and sharing their advice on how to get ready for the first day of school.

Fourthly, parental communication should take many forms and embrace technology. The use of email, texting, websites, electronic portfolios and online assessment and reporting tools have, according to research, made communication between parents and teachers more timely, efficient, productive and satisfying.

So what might this look like in practice?

How to use technology to engage parents

Here are a few suggestions for how technology could be used to help a school communicate with parents, and vice versa:

  • Parents could let teachers know via email or text when the home learning environment may be (temporarily or otherwise) holding a pupil back.
  • Likewise, teachers could email parents to let them know when issues arise at school that may have a detrimental effect on the pupil, such as noticeable changes in behaviour or deficits in academic performance.
  • Teachers could text parents at the end of the day on which a pupil has done something particularly well or shown real progress or promise. Instant and personal feedback like this is really valuable and helps make a connection between the teacher and the parents.
  • Teachers could send half-termly or monthly newsletters via email to parents to inform them about what topics they are covering in class in the coming weeks, what homework will be set and when, and how parents can help.
  • The school could use text, email and the school website to keep parents updated on forthcoming field trips, parent association meetings and other school activities.
  • Teachers could use email to send out regular tips to parents on how they might be able to support their child’s learning that week or month. For example, they could send a list of questions for parents to ask their child about what they have been learning in class. They could also send hyperlinks to interactive quizzes or games.
  • The school could use its website to gather more frequent and informal parent voice information about specific topics. For example, it might post a short survey after each open evening and parents’ evening.
  • The school could provide an online calendar via its website to allow parents to volunteer to help in class, say as reading mentors or at special events.
  • An online calendar could also be used as a booking facility to enable parents to make their own meetings with school staff rather than having to phone the school, which many people find daunting.
  • The online calendar could prove useful for booking slots at parents’ evenings and other open evenings and events, enabling parents to be in control of the times at which they attend school, rather than relying on a child and their teachers to agree suitable slots.

How to engage ‘hard-to-reach’ parents

Even once a school has established and embedded an effective parental engagement strategy, some parents are likely to remain hard to reach, and it’s often these parents with whom a school needs to engage the most. So why do some parents find it difficult to communicate with their child’s school?

For some it’s because they lead busy, complicated lives and schools don’t present themselves as being high on their to-do list. Also, schools’ operating hours tend to clash with parents’ working lives.

For others, it’s because a parent had a difficult experience of school as a youngster and remains reluctant to enter a school building or talk with teachers. They may be daunted and even afraid.

In both these cases, a school may need to consider alternative approaches, such as engaging with parents by telephone in the evenings and at weekends, or meeting with them at another neutral location nearby. The school may even consider using a ‘go-between’, such as another parent who is known to be engaged and reliable.

Some parents may have poor levels of literacy and so will need to be communicated with more sensitively. Schools need to ensure that the nature and purpose of the communication are easy to understand, and that it is easy for the parent to respond without fear of humiliation.

Hard-to-reach parents are often those whom schools need to reach most. This might be because their children attend school infrequently or late, present behavioural challenges when they do attend, and/or have low levels of literacy and/or numeracy, all of which can result from lack of involvement or interest at home.

Where parents have consistently condoned their child’s absence from school, there is much to be done in establishing and developing positive relationships between the school and the parents, and in educating parents on the impact of poor attendance.

The appointment of a specialist, such as a home–school liaison officer, may prove a successful approach where schools need to improve achievement in the longer term.

Much depends on building up and sustaining positive relationships between parents and the school. The introduction of rewards and incentives (that are also seen as being attractive to pupils) can help promote improved attendance, behaviour and achievement. Parents will have their own views about such reward schemes and should be consulted.

Engaging recently immigrated parents

Some parents are hard to reach because they are newly arrived in the UK, have nascent (or no) English skills, and feel alienated from society and schools. Moreover, language and cultural differences can make parents feel intimidated by schools. It is also possible that some parents emigrated from a country where parental involvement in their child’s school was actively discouraged, and their re-education in the ways of English shooling may prove a significant barrier for them.

One solution to this challenge is to arrange for a mother-tongue speaker to meet with parents, offering classes in English language and/or induction sessions to help parents become more familiar with and confident in their understanding of the school system in the UK.

This works both ways, of course. A school may also benefit from arranging information sessions run by recently immigrated parents, aimed at helping staff to gain a better understanding of the lifestyles, traditions and customs of local ethnic minority groups.

Further information

  • ‘The most effective approaches to increasing parental involvement’, E.K. Butler, C. Uline & C.E. Notar, Asian Social Science, 4(5), 2008, pp. 114–23
  • ‘Enhancing parent–teacher communication using technology’, D. Merkley, D. Schmidt, C. Dirksen & C. Fulher, Contemporary issues in technology and teacher education, 6(1), 2006, pp. 11–42
  • The Metlife survey of the American teacher: Teachers, parents and the economy, Metlife, 2012
  • ‘Connecting teachers and parents through the Internet’, D. Tobolka, Tech Directions, 66(5), 2006, pp. 24–26

Toolkit

Use the following items in the Toolkit to put the ideas in the article into practice:

About the author

Matt Bromley is an experienced education writer, consultant, speaker and trainer. In a leadership career of more than 15 years, he was Group Director of a large FE college and multi-academy trust, acting Headteacher of one of the top five most improved schools in England, Deputy Headteacher of a small rural school, and Assistant Headteacher of a large inner-city school. He speaks regularly at conferences and is a successful author of several best-selling books. You can find out more at www.bromleyeducation.co.uk and follow him on Twitter @mj_bromley.

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